Revitalizing the Legacy: Guangcai Porcelain in the Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macao Greater Bay Area

Guangcai Porcelain
Table of Contents
    Add a header to begin generating the table of contents
    35th-103rd The China Import and Export Fair

    35th-103rd The China Import and Export Fair

    Foreign merchants choose porcelain

    Foreign merchants choose porcelain

    With the help of the Canton Fair platform, the best-selling Guangcai

    Guangcai, a traditional form of porcelain, has achieved prosperity and expansion, thanks to the effective platform provided by the The China Import and Export Fair. The fair, originally established in 1957 and referred to as The China Import and Export Fair, is now universally known as the Canton Fair due to its location. With over 60 years of history, it stands as China’s longest-running, most prestigious, and largest international trade fair, attracting countless visitors and generating phenomenal sales volumes.

    Canton Fair Guangcai Catalog
    Canton Fair Guangcai Catalog

    The catalog of Dexinglong Porcelain Shop from the Republic of China era clearly shows the traditional Guangcai patterns such as “Golden Figure Feathers”, “Scattered Sparrow”, “Green Cabbage”, “Cloud Dragon”, “Hundred Butterflies”, and “Babaohua”.

    the 1960s-1970s Hong Kong and Macao colored porcelain catalogs include styles like “Golden Fighting Chicken”, “Scattered Flowers”, “Green Cabbage”, and “Golden Figures”.

    Hong Kong’s Yuedong Porcelain Factory’s 1919 product catalog is no different, also including “golden figures”, “cockfighting”, “scattered flowers” and “green cabbage”.

    Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macau Canton Color Fancy

    Responding to market demand, Guangcai in the Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macao Greater Bay Area has preserved and enriched the traditional styles from the Qing Dynasty through to the Republic of China, showing a shared root and unified origin.

    The Prosperity and Development of Guangdong, Hong Kong and Macau Guangcai

    The prosperous development of Guangcai in Guangdong, Hong Kong, and Macao stems from their commonality in traditional styles and craftsmanship. The rise of the mainland ceramics industry, particularly the Guangzhou Zhijincai Porcelain Factory, has been further bolstered by the Canton Fair. Hong Kong, serving as an entrepot port, developed its local ceramics industry, which subsequently fostered growth in Macao’s ceramics sector. Post-reform and opening up, Hong Kong and Macao porcelain industries set up factories in mainland China, forming a mutually beneficial pattern with orders being placed in Hong Kong and Macao and production occurring in the mainland. The prosperous phase of Guangcai in Guangdong, Hong Kong, and Macao continued well into the 1980s.

    Gold color output

    Output and output value table of Guangzhou Zhijin Colored Porcelain Factory from 1950s to 1980s

    The Hong Kong Yuetung Porcelain Factory at Tai Wo Ping, Hong Kong from 1958 to 1985

    The prosperous development of Guangcai in Guangdong, Hong Kong, and Macao stems from their commonality in traditional styles and craftsmanship. The rise of the mainland ceramics industry, particularly the Guangzhou Zhijincai Porcelain Factory, has been further bolstered by the Canton Fair. Hong Kong, serving as an entrepot port, developed its local ceramics industry, which subsequently fostered growth in Macao’s ceramics sector. Post-reform and opening up, Hong Kong and Macao porcelain industries set up factories in mainland China, forming a mutually beneficial pattern with orders being placed in Hong Kong and Macao and production occurring in the mainland. The prosperous phase of Guangcai in Guangdong, Hong Kong, and Macao continued well into the 1980s.

    Register Data Worker
    Aocai export volume

    Hong Kong’s Yuetung Porcelain Factory, active from 1958 to 1985 in Tai Wo Ping, along with Guangzhou’s Zhijin Colored Porcelain Factory from the 1950s to 1980s, both significantly contributed to the industry’s growth. Moreover, there were many unregistered factories, workers, and homeowners beyond those recorded in the Hong Kong Economic Yearbook. The Yearbook from the early 1960s reported that the export value of Hong Kong colored porcelain consistently exceeded 3 million Hong Kong dollars (reaching 3.53 million Hong Kong dollars in 1963). Statistical data from the Macao Economic Yearbook further substantiates these developments.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *